Archive for the ‘Cookery Courses In Marrakech’ Category

Moroccan Recipes – Chicken and Walnut Tagine

Thursday, December 21st, 2017

Marrakech, indeed Morocco itself, is famous for its variety of delicious tagines. This chicken & walnut tagine is one of our favourite Moroccan recipes.

Moroccan Recipes – Chicken and Walnut Tagine

Chicken and Walnut Tagine

To make this scrumptious Moroccan recipe, you will need: (more…)

6 Must-Try Moroccan Dishes

Thursday, December 7th, 2017

A visit to Marrakech is not complete until you’ve sampled at least a few of the delicious traditional Moroccan dishes served all over the Ochre City. Here are some of our favourite must-try Moroccan dishes.

6 Must-Try Moroccan Dishes

Moroccan Dishes 1

B’ssara – The first of our must-try Moroccan dishes is B’ssara, a rich soup made from dried broad beans. Traditionally a breakfast dish, this scrumptious soup is usually topped with a sprinkling of cumin, a swirl of olive oil and served with oven-fresh bread.

Tagines – The tagine, a clay cooking pot with a conical lid, lends its name to a multitude of simply delicious traditional dishes (chicken, lamb, beef, fish and vegetable) as popular at top-notch restaurants as roadside cafes.

(more…)

Visiting Marrakech in December

Monday, November 13th, 2017

Although visiting Marrakech in December may involve packing a few items of warmer clothing for the evenings, the climate is by no means cold, in the European sense, despite the presence of the snow-capped Atlas, as temperatures range from a minimum 6 degrees at night to 19 during the afternoon and sunshine hours average a perfectly respectable 7 hours per day.

Visiting Marrakech in December – Events and Festivals

The month begins with Mawlid un Nabi, a festival marking the birth of the Prophet Muhammad. This is a day of prayer for Muslims combined with performances of the Prophet’s story through related poems and odes.

Visiting Marrakech in DecemberThis month also sees the staging of the renowned Marrakech International Film Festival, a long established event (scheduled to take place between the 2nd and 10th December) attended by national and international film makers including famous producers, directors and actors. (N. B. These dates could not be precisely confirmed at time of writing). Screens are set up in several places for free public viewings of films including the central ‘Place Jemaa el Fna’.

(more…)

Traditional Moroccan Cuisine: Kefta Mkaouara, a Moroccan Meatball Tagine

Monday, September 18th, 2017

Featuring well-seasoned meatballs in spicy tomato sauce, Kefta Mkaouara is a wonderful example of traditional Moroccan cuisine. Here’s how to make it.

Traditional Moroccan Cuisine

In traditional Moroccan cuisine, Kefta Mkaouara is a classic dish prepared in a tagine (although you can also use a wide, deep skillet with lid). To make it, you will need the following ingredients (tsp = teaspoon/s; tbsp. = tablespoon/s).

For the sauce:

  • 2 lbs of fresh, ripe tomatoes; peeled, seeded & chopped
  • 1 very finely chopped medium onion
  • 1 1/2 tsp of paprika
  • 1 1/2 tsp of cumin
  • 1 1/2 tsp of salt
  • 1/4 tsp of black pepper
  • 3 tbsp. of fresh, finely chopped parsley
  • 3 tbsp. of fresh, finely chopped cilantro (coriander)
  • 3 – 5 garlic cloves, pressed
  • 1/3 of a cup of olive oil
  • 1 bay leaf

(more…)

Moroccan Flavours – Bidawi Couscous & Seven Vegetables

Monday, February 1st, 2016

Typically served on a large platter as a mound of semolina with the meat and vegetables placed with their broth into the central crater, this delightful dish provides a scrumptious taste of Morocco. Traditionally accompanied by bowls of the remaining broth, small dishes of harissa and varying other condiments, it is eaten by forming balls of the food in the hand.

Ingredients

To prepare six servings of this delicious meal you will need:

  • 1.5 kg of fairly fatty mutton (saddle or shoulder) or veal (shank, shoulder or neck )
  • 800 g of cabbage
  • 1 piece of stale bread
  • 15 ml of lemon juice
  • 4 whole cloves
  • 1 kg of onions (more…)

Ras El Hanout – recipe for the finest of Moroccan spice blends

Monday, September 21st, 2015

Used mainly by Moroccans in elaborate, celebratory dishes, the aromatic, complex spice blend known as Rass, or Ras El Hanout (literally translated as ‘head, or top, of the shop’), is prepared by grinding together two dozen or more whole spices and dried leaves/roots .

Ingredients of Ras El Hanout recipe

Every shop and spice merchant has his own ‘secret’ recipe for this delightful blend but, as a rule, it will contain a mix of:

  • Cardamom, Clove and Cinnamon
  • Coriander, Cumin and Paprika (sweet and/or hot)
  • Mace and Nutmeg
  • Peppercorn and Turmeric

Other, more exotic ingredients often added by spice sellers include: (more…)

M’rouzia recipe, a spicy-sweet Moroccan lamb tajine

Friday, August 21st, 2015

The M’rouzia is a delicious Moroccan tagine combining lamb, raisins, honey and almonds and a selection of herbs and spices, including Ras El Hanout, to make a deliciously sweet and spicy dish. Here is a M’rouzia recipe for serving six people:

Ingredients

  • About 3 lbs (1½ kg) lamb (neck, shanks or shoulder) cut into pieces of 3″ square
  • Ras El Hanout, 2 tsp (teaspoons)
  • Ground ginger, 2 tsp
  • Salt, 1 ½ tsp
  • Pepper, 1 tsp
  • Turmeric, ½ tsp
  • Crumbled saffron threads, ½ tsp

(more…)

Themed Break Bargains in Marrakech

Thursday, December 18th, 2014

While enjoying a short sunny break in Marrakech there are many activities you can indulge in, from golf to trekking in the Atlas Mountains and shopping in the souks. But there are many other options for getting the most out of that precious weekend away.

At Les Borjs de la Kasbah, for example, in the Marrakech medina, one can join a cookery class on Moroccan cuisine, enjoy a series of spa treatments including the traditional hammam bath, or visit Marrakech and its surroundings with a series of excursions.

There is even a Romance package with champagne, flowers and more for that special occasion.

The big difference at Les Borjs, however, is that these themed activities are included – i.e. there is no charge at all beyond the cost of a room!

(more…)

How to make couscous the traditional way

Monday, September 22nd, 2014

How to make couscous the traditional way – The Couscoussier, a vital Utensil in Traditional Moroccan Cooking.

Many recipes for Moroccan dishes involve the preparation of couscous or vegetables in couscoussiers. Prepared in the traditional manner it is a time consuming process! Here is a brief explanation of this cooking utensil and how to make couscous the traditional way.

The Couscoussier 

Traditionally in ceramic or metal (aluminium, copper or steel), couscoussiers comprise two interlocking pots. The larger bottom pot is used to cook broths, stews or soups (although it is also common to fill it with water for use as a steamer) while the smaller upper pot has a perforated base with a lid. Placed on top of the larger pot it is used to steam couscous or vegetables.

Steaming Couscous

Traditionally, couscous is steamed over stews etc, simmering away in the lower part of a couscoussier. The steaming process typically involves two or three stages.

Stage 1 – the first stage of steaming couscous involves dampening it by placing it into a bowl, sprinkling it with slightly salted water and/ or oil and evenly mixing the grains with hands that have first been rubbed in oil, breaking up any lumps that may have formed.

(more…)

Marrakech recipe – ‘Gazelle Horns’, a tasty Moroccan patisserie

Monday, March 17th, 2014

While Moroccan meals typically conclude with a helping of fresh fruit (figs, dates, oranges with cinnamon), or just a mint tea, the most common dessert is a selection of classic Moroccan patisseries, notable among them being Kaab el Ghazal, or gazelle horns. Flavoured with cinnamon and orange blossom water, they consist of a scented almond paste wrapped in delicate pastry, moulded into a crescent shape and baked until just golden. Here is the recipe.

Making Almond Paste

To make these delicious little sweetmeats, you need first to create the almond paste. For this, you will need the following ingredients (enough to make 50 ‘gazelle horns’).

  • 500 g (1 lb) skinned, blanched almonds
  • 275 g (1 1/3 cups) sugar
  • 75 ml (1/3 cup) orange blossom water
  • 60 g (1/4 cup) melted, unsalted butter
  • 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
  • Gum Arabic or mastic powder (optional)

Grind the almonds in a food processor for about five minutes and then mould the resulting mix into a paste. Using your fingers to mix them thoroughly, add the remaining ingredients into the paste, adding extra cinnamon, sugar and/or orange flower water to produce the desired flavour. Shape small portions of this paste into sticks, each roughly the size of the little finger; cover and place them into the fridge.

(more…)