Marrakech to Essaouira: a day trip

Wednesday, May 1st, 2013

If you’re visiting Marrakech for long enough to afford taking a day out of town, the ancient port of Mogador, the modern day Essaouira, is well worth the two and a half hour trip.

A small, picturesque seaport with a shipyard and important fishing fleet, Essaouira is unlike almost any other town in Morocco due largely to the fact that it was developed originally by the Portuguese, a heritage accounting for much of its character and charm. The walled town stands on a narrow peninsula sheltering a vast bay and crescent of fine sand.

A Unesco World Heritage Site, it is a fascinating example of 18th century European military architecture, notably its sea defences, constructed by the French and equipped with an impressive row of Spanish canons. From this fortified Scala there is a splendid outlook over the sea and Atlantic rollers crashing against the rocks.

A few yards from the busy fishing port, the medina features a large square and a couple of wide boulevards as well as a maze of narrow streets, all the more pleasant for being pedestrianised. Read the rest of this entry »

New Summer Menus from our talented young chef

Monday, April 15th, 2013

In February 2013, a range of newly-created Spring and Summer menus was introduced to our hotel’s ‘Le Jasmin’ restaurant by our young head chef, Houcein Id Ahmed.

Having joined Les Borjs in January 2011 as commis chef, Houcein rapidly proved his worth and in January 2013 he was given his chance to take full charge of the kitchen. His first job was to produce new menus for the Moroccan and European à la carte menus as well as around a dozen, daily changing half board menus and a range of lighter meals served to residents at the poolside bar.

As an example of the dishes to be found in our ‘Le Jasmin’ restaurant, you can allow yourself to be tempted by, amongst many others: Sea bass tagine with vegetables and olive m’charmal, Berber style; a Timbale dish of prawns and shrimps with purée of lemon-infused avocado and a pear-almond salsa; Stuffed beef roll cooked with thyme; Clove-flavoured duck breast garnished with young vegetables; Pastilla mille feuilles with pineapple and honey cream.

Vegetarians are also well provided for with dishes including: Corn risotto of courgette and parmesan with mascarpone mushrooms and Vegetable roll in flaky ‘brick’ pastry served with a mixed salad.

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Events in Marrakech April 2013

Tuesday, April 2nd, 2013

If you’re visiting Marrakech in April 2013, you might be interested in these events:

Awaln’art : International Encounters with Art in Public Places, 11-14 April

Marrakech is hosting the 7th edition of the Festival Awaln’art: International Encounters with Art in Public Places. If you’re in the city at this time, you’ll definitely not want to miss this dynamic display of Moroccan art and culture.

The festival is a celebration of street art and invites local artists and members of the public to join Awaln’art in its creation of prominently displayed public artworks, sculptures as well as giant puppets roaming the streets and performance art , all free of charge!

The Marrakech Atlas Etape, 28 April

The Marrakech Atlas Etape is a charity bike ride that starts and ends in Marrakech.

A one day affair, it offers two routes from Marrakech, a merely ‘demanding ’ one (a 60km ride to Ourika and back) and a ‘really challenging’ one (140km to Oukaïmeden, in the High Atlas, and back). Read the rest of this entry »

Five more places to visit in Marrakech

Monday, April 1st, 2013

Last month we published a selection of five of the best-known buildings in Marrakech illustrating different periods of the city’s rich cultural heritage. Here are another five buildings, monuments and gardens which should also be included on one’s list of ‘what to see in Marrakech’.

1. The Musée Dar Si Said. This museum of Moroccan Art is situated in a 19th century palace built for Si Saïd ibn Moussa, the Minister of War, in the mid 19th century. It surrounds a splendid courtyard, full of flowers and shady cypress trees, with a gazebo and fountain.

The exhibition rooms around the courtyard display a wide range of items from the long history of arts and crafts including carved doors, extraordinary stucco artistry and mosaics, plus jewellery, rugs, wedding costumes, leatherwork items and pottery. One can also visit the domed reception room and the former harem quarters.

2. The Ben Youssef koranic school. Situated close to the centre of Marrakech, this fascinating building is a former Islamic college where students came to learn and study the Koran. Founded in the 14th century, it was rebuilt in the 16th century during the Saadian Dynasty. Student cells and other rooms are disposed on three floors around a central courtyard dominated by a large pool in which students carried out their ablutions. The larger reception rooms are notable for their beautifully decorated and carved cedar beamed ceilings, marble floors and intricate plaster stuccowork. Wall and floor tiles, set in geometric patterns, bear inscriptions and quotations from the Koran. The school closed in 1960 but was restored and opened as an historical site in 1982.

3. The Palais des Congrès (conference centre). This contemporary building, resplendent with Islamic decorative overtones, is the city’s principle exhibition centre, home to major events such as the International Film Festival, numerous conferences and trade fairs. The space, which can accommodate up to 5,500 people, is located in the elegant Hivernage district on Boulevard Mohamed VI, home to many of the smartest hotels and residences.

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Perfect couscous – Marrakech style! How to make perfect couscous

Friday, March 15th, 2013

Couscous is a versatile staple of Moroccan cuisine. It comes in two forms, the standard ‘as-nature-intended’ version or pre-steamed, although the latter, despite being easy and quick to make, tends to lose some of its flavour in the process. Here’s how to make perfect couscous, Marrakech style.

To make this dish one really needs a couscoussier, a perforated steamer, although a fine colander may suffice.

1)      Moisten the couscous by adding ½ cup of water to 3 cups of medium grain couscous. Leave the couscous to absorb the water for 10 minutes.

2)      Repeat this process. Each grain should now be swollen and you should be able to pass each through your fingers without lumps!

3)      Add 2 tablespoons of olive oil to the couscous.

4)      Bring a pan of water to the boil and steam the couscous on medium heat for 20 minutes.

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Five must-see architectural gems of Marrakech

Thursday, February 28th, 2013

Founded in the 11th century, Marrakech is a city steeped in history, as evidenced by several of its most famous monuments and buildings. Here are five examples of Moroccan architecture in Marrakech that shouldn’t be missed.

1. Tombeaux Saadiens. Only a few hundred yards from Les Borjs de la Kasbah, these highly decorated tombs form one of the most important heritage sites in Morocco. One of the few remaining vestiges of the important Saadien dynasty, they date from the time of Sultan Ahmad al-Mansur (1578-1603) although were sealed off on the orders of Alaouite Sultan Moulay Ismail who wanted all traces of the Saadien dynasty to be destroyed. Untouched for more than two centuries, the tombs were uncovered in 1917 and restored by the national ‘Beaux-Arts’ service. Due to their intricate decoration, a clear indication of the opulence of the time and a perfect example of the beauty of Islamic art, the tombs are a major attraction for visitors to Marrakech and should be high on your list of “what to see in Marrakech”. Expect domed ceilings, intricately carved marble pillars, cedar wood ceilings  and, most notably, extensive use of exquisite mosaic decoration.

2. Mansouria Mosque. Built by Yaqub al-Mansur, the Mansouria Mosque is also known as the Kasbah Mosque, being just 100 yards from the monumental gate into this fortified southern part of the Marrakech medina, Bab Agnaou. Although access to the interior is not open to non-Muslims, one can admire the impressive architecture of the building now restored to its former glory following an extensive facelift.

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How to make Marrakech Stuffed Flatbreads (Khobz Bishemar)

Friday, February 15th, 2013

Bread, in some form or other, is served with most meals in Morocco. In Marrakech, as everywhere else in the country, it is normal to prepare bread at home each morning and then have it baked in the traditional manner at one of many communal ovens in the neighbourhood.

One particularly tasty type of speciality bread made in Morocco and other North African countries is Khobz Bishemar, a wholewheat flatbread made with a blend of spices and herbs and filled with beef suet and onions.

Here is a simple and delicious recipe for it which you might wish to try.

Ingredients:

For the Bread:

  • 1 packet active dried yeast
  • 60ml lukewarm water
  • 280g unbleached flour
  • 1 tsp salt

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Les Borjs pool reopens

Tuesday, February 5th, 2013

After just six years in operation, our 10m swimming pool at Les Borjs was in need of a facelift.

To cause the minimum of disruption to users, we decided to close the area for two weeks in December while a major refurbishment was undertaken, a job which involved emptying the pool and relining it with a sparkling mother-of-pearl type of tiling, replacement of the underwater lights and a new heating system.

We are happy to report that the refurbished pool is once again up and running and, being heated to 23 degrees, being enjoyed by guests (yes, even in February!), as are the sun loungers on the pool deck area around it and the poolside bar.

Come and join us. The water’s lovely!

5 alternative activities in Marrakech

Friday, February 1st, 2013

A hive of activity year round, Marrakech fizzes along with its varied menu of delights to tourists from the world over. As we have covered a number of these in previous posts we thought it would be useful to mention a short selection of alternative attractions, most of them outside the city of Marrakech itself.

1)     The Berbers of Morocco. The Berber Cultural Centre offers a glimpse into the history and culture of Morocco’s indigenous people (Arabs began to arrive only in the 8th century) comprising around half of the population today, most of them in the south-west and the mountainous areas of the High and Middle Atlas.

This fascinating centre reveals the full colourful history and customs of the Berber people from pre-Arab times to the present day.

2)     Jetski in Marrakech! Why not?! Just 30 minutes from Marrakech, at the foot of the High Atlas, snow capped in winter, you’ll find Lake Takerkoust, home to Atlas Jet and a private beach. Here you can ‘max out’ on thrills thanks to the latest Yamaha jetskis.

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Events in Marrakech February and March 2013

Friday, January 18th, 2013

Events in Marrakech February 2013

The Dakka Marrakchia Festival 1–28 February 2013

This annual festival of traditional Marrakchi music, which has taken place in one form or other for hundreds of years, is the opportunity for local people, professionals as well as enthusiastic amateurs, to express their musical talents.

At several street venues the air is filled with the sounds of Berber and other traditional music and frenetic rhythmic drumming.

Events in Marrakech March 2013

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